Category: Interviews

Margot for ELLE

Margot for ELLE

Margot Robbie Makes Her Move

ELLE – Margot Robbie is, yes, a knockout. But like the women she’s portrayed in her decade-long career—a trophy wife on a mission in The Wolf of Wall Street; a balls-to-the-wall war reporter in Whiskey Tango Foxtrot; the feisty, feminist Jane in The Legend of Tarzan; and, of course, Suicide Squad’s lovable lunatic criminal, Harley Quinn—the Aussie stunner is so much more than an ingenue. Below, find a preview of Robbie’s February cover interview with her I, Tonya co-star, Allison Janney, where she discusses her future as a director, the highlight of her career and what it was like playing Tonya Harding:

On fear of playing a real-life character: “…playing Tonya [Harding], who’s very much alive and is widely documented, can be more intimidating.”

On directing: “I still love acting. But I’ve spent the last 10 years on a film set, and I realized that if I am pouring my heart and soul into a film, I want to be one of those voices in the conversation making decisions.”

On the first highlight of her career: “When I got to New York for the first time, I took my first paycheck, walked straight into Tiffany’s on Fifth Avenue, and bought an airplane charm that goes on my bracelet. It was the best feeling ever. I got my little blue box, and I got it for myself.”

On which skill she wants to master: “I recently bought fire-twirling poles, because I really want to get good at it. When I was backpacking in the Philippines, there were heaps of fire twirlers on the beach, and it was so cool. I was like, Wow, I really want to do that!”

Hair by Renato Campora at the Wall Group; makeup by Pati Dubroff at Forward Artists; manicure by Alexandra Jachno; set design by Bryan Porter for Owl and the Elephant; produced by Nathalie Akiya at Kranky Produktions; fashion assistants: Yashua Simmons and Mark-Paul Barro

This article originally appears in the February 2018 issue of ELLE.

The Hollywood Reporter’s First-Ever Live Roundtable

The Hollywood Reporter’s First-Ever Live Roundtable

THR’s First-Ever Live Roundtable: 6 Stars on Harassment, Nude Scenes and People They “Despise”

Bryan Cranston, Armie Hammer, Robert Pattinson, Diane Kruger, Margot Robbie and Octavia Spencer sat down before a studio audience for The Hollywood Reporter’s inaugural movie star summit about their craft, the cons of social media and how one ended up with a severed human foot.

After two decades of awards-season roundtables gathering Hollywood’s top creative talents for frank, funny and memorable conversations, THR this year decided to throw out the rule book for the final star-studded sit-down of 2017: Instead of splitting up male and female actors (as almost all honors do, from the industry-establishment Oscars to the indie-minded Spirit Awards), the Dec. 7 discussion at West Hollywood’s Quixote Studios was a co-ed affair. And instead of taking place in a clinically silent, closed studio environment, it was conducted before a live audience of Hollywood insiders who took in the proceedings with laughs (especially at 61-year-old Last Flag Flying star Bryan Cranston’s impish one-liners), sighs (at the cautiously hopeful comments about sexual harassment in Hollywood from In the Fade’s Diane Kruger, 41, and The Shape of Water’s Octavia Spencer, 47) and a few gasps (mostly to do with I, Tonya’s Margot Robbie, 27, and a severed foot — read on). These stars, together with Call Me by Your Name’s Armie Hammer, 31, and Good Time’s Robert Pattinson, 31, didn’t let the 200 people watching cramp their conversational style — they’re actors, after all — as they animated one of the most competitive awards seasons in memory with a lively back-and-forth about the craft that unites them and the kind of artists, leaders and mentors they want to be.

Continue to the interview…

Margot on “Popcorn with Peter Travers”


ABC NEWS – “I, Tonya” star Margot Robbie was nominated for her first SAG Award on Tuesday, and she found out during a taping of ABC News’ “Popcorn With Peter Travers.”

While talking about the acclaimed film focused on the life of Olympian Tonya Harding, Robbie turned to her publicist in the room and said, “Oh, my God! What?!”

It’s at that moment she found out about the great honor.

“That’s so exciting!” she added after congratulations from host Peter Travers. “Oh, my God, amazing. Oh, wow.”

The longtime Rolling Stone critic said that he “never got a reaction at that moment” when someone is overjoyed to find out his or her work is being recognized.

“Breaking news! That was, like, as immediate as it could be,” Robbie said. “When you make the film, you’re so worried about actually pulling it off and making it or even making the days or even getting everything shot so you can piece it all together to have a film that you kind of forget about the part when you show everyone and wait to see what they think. Yeah, it’s scary. So now everyone knows. Now we know that everyone thinks it’s good. That’s really nice.”

Time Out New York Interview

Margot Robbie talks her brutal, Oscar-worthy turn in I, Tonya

TIME OUT NEW YORK – In I, Tonya—as high-octane and thrilling as biopics come—Margot Robbie skates into the role of a lifetime

Stamina, flair, toughness: Anyone who tells you acting isn’t a lot like playing sports hasn’t spent much time doing either. Ever since holding her own against a manic Leonardo DiCaprio in The Wolf of Wall Street, Margot Robbie could never be confused for anything less than a fearless competitor. But her latest performance seriously ups the ante: As the disgraced Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding—forever tarnished by her association with the 1994 off-ice attack on Nancy Kerrigan—the 27-year-old actor pulls off one of the most daring feats of empathy of the year. Directed by Craig Gillespie and coproduced by Robbie herself, I, Tonya is a supercharged Scorsesian rise-and-fall sports movie: trashy, funny, devastating and anchored by a star turn that will be talked about long beyond awards season. Born in Australia before living in Brooklyn, London and most recently Los Angeles, Robbie calls herself a gypsy; “home” is a free-floating concept for her. During a relatively quiet moment before the Oscar whirlwind, we connected with Robbie to talk about lacing up for 17-hour shooting days, the Harvey Weinstein scandal and the enigma at the heart of her latest triumph.
Continue reading

Margot’s Interview with “The Cut” Magazine

Margot Robbie on Being a Harry Potter Nerd and Not Taking Jared Leto’s Scent Suggestions

While Vanity Fair may find Margot Robbie “too fresh to be pegged,” she’s pretty willing to do it herself — at least when it comes to Harry Potter. “I manipulated the answers,” she said, when I ask the admitted Potter nerd (on Jimmy Kimmel, she showed a photo of herself at 13 with glasses, braces, and holding a cup of tea and a Harry Potter book), whether she’s ever taken a Sorting Hat quiz. During a press day from London as the new face of deep Euphoria Calvin Klein, I forgot to ask Robbie what her patronus would be, but I did find out where she thinks the Sorting Hat would place her, the weird smell Jared Leto thought the Joker would have, and her thoughts on not putting down other women.

Did you play a specific character in the deep Euphoria shoot?
That was the tricky part. With any kind of photo shoot or campaign, they want to see you be yourself, but what I do at work is to play someone else. Photo shoots are terrifying. Photographers are like, “Just show me you!” and I’m like, “Oh, me? I wouldn’t be doing this. I wouldn’t be sprawled out on a couch like this. I would be in a tracksuit.”

But Francis Lawrence, a film director, did the campaign, so it was so much easier for me to sit down with him and say, “Okay, so here’s the concept. This is where you are. This is what you’re thinking.” We’re blurring the lines between fantasy and reality so you can associate things with your own experiences and you can kind of fabricate the world you’re in at the same time.

What was your first scent memory?
I remember being a kid and seeing my mom’s perfumes lined up on the bathroom bench. I was definitely aware that only older women — grown-up women — wore perfume. I was so thrilled at the idea that I was going to be grown up and be able to wear perfume, too. Whenever I smell my mum, I feel like a little kid again.
Continue reading